Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on reddit

The true cost of your DNA

Shouldn't you be rewarded if you are the product?
Dateline: 23 September 2023

A bit more than a decade ago, it would have cost you US$ 10,000 to have your entire genome sequenced; four years ago, about $100. But now, you can take the highest bidder, and get paid for your genomic data.

Of course, the first complete sequence of a human genome was an enormous undertaking, as there was no reference data, and the project cost an estimated US$ 2.7 billion, but Moore’s Law soon came into effect, and prices plummeted as the tech became mainstream and automated.

Soon it was the services around your DNA data, that were the interesting thing, like interpretation and diagnostics. Consumer DNA company ’23andMe’ famously offered a $199 package that included testing and basic analysis of risk profiles, or genotype as they called it. Later a premium product was launched, but scientists warned against treating the data as gospel. Predictive genotyping is tricky.

The breakthrough came with using artificial intelligence, deep reinforced learning, to make accurate predictive diagnostics from whole genome data. But deep learning requires lots and lots of data, to refine and improve the neural network’s performance.

So now genotyping companies are vying for your data; they’ll pay for it, or give you free analysis packages, if you’ll submit your samples for testing. Provided you waive all rights to the raw DNA data; which includes duplication and cloning.

The true cost of your DNA? In the right hands, it’s priceless!

Links to related stories

Warning: Hazardous Thinking at Work

Despite appearances to the contrary, Futureworld cannot and does not predict the future. Our Mindbullets scenarios are fictitious and designed purely to explore possible futures, challenge and stimulate strategic thinking. Use these at your own risk. Any reference to actual people, entities or events is entirely allegorical. Copyright Futureworld International Limited. Reproduction or distribution permitted only with recognition of Copyright and the inclusion of this disclaimer. © Public domain image.

Like this article?

Share on facebook
Share on Facebook
Share on twitter
Share on Twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Share on Pinterest

Read another Mindbullet

Dopamine hailed as the new weapon in the fight against crime and anti-social behaviour
Dateline: 1 June 2021
In 2019, Lyla Roberts was assaulted at a bus stop in London. A bystander recorded the incident and posted it online, instead of intervening. The title of the post: “5 star entertainment! Who needs the movies!?” Roberts spent four months in a coma before being declared brain dead. It shocked the world, but has also...

Sign up to receive news from the future